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Fernande de Mertens

Fernande de Mertens was the fifth of six children of the baron Edouard Mertens and his wife Sophie Lambertine Woelfling, and Fernande was thus a baroness herself. Helene Echinard writes that in Marseille, Fernande attended the Ecole des Beaux-Art ...

                                               

Margaret Davies (conservationist)

Margaret Davies CBE was an English conservationist and archaeologist. She was the first chair of the Welsh Committee of the Countryside Commission, was also president of the Cardiff Naturalists Club and on the Council of the National Museum of Wales.

                                               

Howard Douglas (park superintendent)

Howard Douglas was born in Halton District, Ontario in 1850. He was the son of Thomas Douglas, a farmer, and the oldest of four boys. Howard Douglas spent his boyhood and youth in the east. He married Alice Maud Johnston, the daughter of a ship c ...

                                               

Eugene Clark

Torchy Clark Eugene Clark, 1929–2009, first basketball coach at the University of Central Florida Eugene Clark rower 1906-1981, American Olympic rower

                                               

Paula Trock

Paula Trock was a Danish weaver who began producing her own fabrics at the Troba workshop in Sonderborg in the early 1930s. In 1945, she established Spindegården near Vejen in the south of Jutland which she headed until 1969. There she developed ...

                                               

Memnonia

Memnonia Institute, defunct health institute in Yellow Springs, Ohio, opened by Mary Gove Nichols Monuments in Egypt described by Strabo XVII.42 as a Memnonium sites in Abydos Memnonia quadrangle, a region of Mars sites in Thebes the Labyrinth Me ...

                                               

Karl Junker

Karl Junker attended school in Lemgo from 1857 to 1864. From 1865–1866 to 1868–1869 he was trained as a carpenter by Wilhelm Stapperfenne. Junker lived in Hamburg, where he probably worked and studied as a carpenter or cabinetmaker from 1869 to 1 ...

                                               

71st Regiment

71st Regiment may refer to: 71st Infantry Regiment New York, New York State Guard regiment established in 1850 71st Regiment of Foot, Frasers Highlanders, former British Army regiment, raised for the American Revolution, 1775–1786 71st Coorg Rifl ...

                                               

Neck (disambiguation)

Neck of the urinary bladder Neck of the pancreas Neck of the gallbladder

                                               

Mary Byrne (witness)

Mary Byrne later Mary OConnell was an Irish woman considered to be the chief witness of the apparition at Knock, County Mayo.

                                               

Edward Walsh

Edward Walsh rugby player 1861–1939, Irish rugby union player Ed Walsh ice hockey born 1951, retired goaltender Ed Walsh, Jr. 1905–1937, Major League pitcher, son of Ed Walsh Eddie Walsh footballer 1914–2006, Kerry Gaelic footballer Ed Walsh 1881 ...

                                               

Guillaume Guelpa

Guillaume Guelpa was a French doctor, born in Italy. He was an important diabetes medical researcher in the days before the invention of insulin in the early 1920s. During the First World War he invented the medical rack for treatment of all frac ...

                                               

Sandy Lake

Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa, Native American tribe in Minnesota, United States Sandy Lake Tragedy, the culmination in 1850 of a series of events centered in Sandy Lake, Minnesota Sandy Lake First Nation, independent Oji-Cree First Nat ...

                                               

Siege of Aleppo

Siege of Aleppo or Battle of Aleppo may refer to: Siege of Aleppo 1071 by Alp Arslan Battle of Aleppo 1918, during World War I Siege of Aleppo 969, during the Byzantine-Arab wars Siege of Aleppo 994–995, during the Byzantine-Arab wars Siege of Al ...

                                               

Choa Mountains

The Choa Mountains are a mountain range in Manica Province of Mozambique. The mountains lie in Barue District, west of Catandica. The mountains are at the northern end of the Eastern Highlands. The higher Nyanga Mountains lie to the southwest. Th ...

                                               

Camptown

Camptown, Scottish Borders, Scotland Camptown country subdivision, a provincial capital in Lesotho Camptown, Pennsylvania, United States Camptown, Virginia, United States

                                               

Frank Hill (disambiguation)

Frank Hill was a Scottish football player and manager. Frank Hill may also refer to: Frank Hill Australian politician 1883–1945, Australian politician Frank Harrison Hill 1830–1910, English journalist Frank Hill scientist born 1951, American astr ...

                                               

Cressy

Cressy, Tasmania, Australia, a town Electoral district of Cressy, a former electoral district of the Tasmanian House of Assembly Cressy, Victoria, Australia, a town Cressy, California, former name of Cressey, California, United States, a census-d ...

                                               

Mickey (disambiguation)

Mickey 1918 film, a silent film by F. Richard Jones Mickey TV series, a 1964–1965 TV series Mickey 1948 film, based on the novel Clementine Mickey 2004 film, a baseball film "Mickey" song, a 1981 song by Toni Basil

                                               

On Pre-Islamic Poetry

On Pre-Islamic Poetry is a book of literary criticism published in 1926 by the Egyptian author Taha Hussein. In it, Hussein argued that some pre-Islamic poetry was inauthentic, and cast doubt on the authenticity of the Quran. The books publicatio ...

                                               

All That Glitters

All That Glitters, a novel by Michael Anthony All That Glitters novel, by V. C. Andrews All That Glitters, a memoir by Pearl Lowe "All That Glitters", the first part of the Bionicle comic Journeys End

                                               

Orator (disambiguation)

Attic orators Given name Orator Henry LaCraft 1850–?, member of the South Dakota Senate Orator Fuller Cook 1867–1949, American botanist and entomologist Orator Shafer 1851–1922, American baseball player

                                               

Fall of Rome (disambiguation)

Capture of Rome 1870 by the Kingdom of Sardinia Battle of Monte Cassino 1944 which included the Fall of Rome ; during WWII Sack of Rome disambiguation, where the city of Rome is defeated Fall of the Western Roman Empire, where Rome the country is ...

                                               

Johann Sioly

Born in Vienna, Sioly studied violin from 1853 to 1859 and was a pianist and composer in various Viennese folk singing societies from 1861. Influenced by the Viennese mentality, Sioly began early on to write and compose Viennese songs. The politi ...

                                               

Noblesse Oblige (disambiguation)

"Noblesse Oblige" short story, a 1934 short story by P. G. Wodehouse Noblesse oblige, an 1851 novel by Cesar Lecat de Bazancourt Noblesse Oblige book, a 1956 humorous book on U and non-U English, nominally edited by Nancy Mitford

                                               

Joseph McLaughlin

Joseph McLaughlin may refer to: Joseph M. McLaughlin 1933–2013, American academic and US federal appellate court judge Joseph McLaughlin 1922–1999, Irish tenor better known as Josef Locke Joseph McLaughlin Pennsylvania politician 1867–1926, US Re ...

                                               

Michael Phillips

Michael Phillips may refer to: Michael Phillips psychiatrist, Canadian psychiatrist Michael Phillips figure skater died 2016, British figure skater and ice dancer Michael Phillips consultant born 1938, created MasterCard in 1966 Michael Phillips ...

                                               

Tonelero

Battle of The Tonelero Pass, a battle fought on 17 December 1851, during the Platine War, between the Argentine Confederation Army and the Empire of Brazil Navy.

                                               

Brussels (disambiguation)

Brussels, officially the Brussels-Capital Region, is a region of Belgium which includes the City of Brussels which is the capital of Belgium. Brussels may also refer to:

                                               

Jules Putzeys

Jules Antoine Adolphe Henri Putzeys was a Belgian magistrate and an entomologist who took a special interest in the beetles belonging to the family Carabidae. Putzeys was born in Liege and obtained a doctoral degree at the age of 20. He worked at ...

                                               

Charles Hugo (writer)

When Charles took up the fight against capital punishment in 1851 and found himself dismissed by the courts, he was jailed for 6 months for an article in LEvenement. His father Victor Hugo gave a memorable speech in his defence on June 10, 1851. ...

                                               

John Maguire

John Maguire may refer to: Jack Maguire 1925–2001, American baseball player John Maguire Irish politician died 1872, Irish politician John Maguire fighter born 1983, English mixed martial artist John M. Maguire, CEO of Friendlys John Maguire arch ...

                                               

Bruce Smith (disambiguation)

Bruce Smith is a retired American football player who holds the NFL record for most career quarterback sacks. Bruce Smith may also refer to: Bruce Smith musician, former drummer with The Pop Group Bruce Smith rugby union born 1959, New Zealand ru ...

                                               

Robert McLeod

Bob McLeod cyclist 1913–1958, Canadian Olympic cyclist Bob McLeod cricketer 1868–1907, Australian cricketer Bob McLeod American football born 1938, American football player

                                               

Cathedral of St. James

Saint-Jacques Cathedral Montreal, mostly demolished Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral in Montreal, originally known as Saint James Cathedral Cathedral Church of St. James Toronto St. James Cathedral Peace River, Alberta

                                               

Castle House

Castle House may refer to: Castle House, Usk, a listed building in Monmouthshire, Wales Castle House, Laugharne, a Georgian Mansion in Carmarthenshire, Wales Castle House, now the site of Old College, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales Castle House, ...

                                               

Donald MacIntyre

Donald MacIntyre or McIntyre may refer to: Donald Macintyre, Scottish Gaelic poet and author of "Oran na Cloiche" Don McIntyre 1915–2013, Australian rules footballer Donald Macintyre Royal Navy officer 1904–1981, Royal Navy officer in World War I ...

                                               

Temple of Seti I (Abydos)

The temple of Seti I also known as the Great Temple of Abydos is one of the main historical sites in Abydos. The temple was build by pharaoh Seti I. At the rear of the temple there is the Osireion.

                                               

Frank Cousins (photographer)

Frank Cousins was an American writer and photographer of Federal style architecture in New England. Cousins’s photographs added to the preservation movement in the early 1900s by documenting buildings and a style of architecture that was in dange ...

                                               

Herald of Freedom

Herald of Freedom may refer to: Herald of Freedom and Torch Light, a newspaper published in Hagerstown, Maryland 1851 to 1863 Herald of Freedom essay, an essay by Henry David Thoreau Herald of Freedom Hagerstown newspaper, a newspaper published i ...

                                               

Durkee

Durkee may refer to: Reese Durkee, fictional character on the soap opera Passions Will Durkee born c. 1983, poker player William Durkee Williamson 1779–1846, American politician from Maine Charlie Durkee born 1944, placekicker for the New Orleans ...

                                               

The Master Thief (play)

The Master Thief is a mystery play based on a story by Richard Washburn Child, dramatized by playwright E. E. Rose. It has sixteen speaking roles. Although it was reported in the press that there were plans to film the story, this never came to pass.

                                               

Alexander Hore

Alexander Hugh Hore was an English first-class cricketer and clergyman. The son of James Hore, he was born in September 1829 at Camberwell. He was educated at Tonbridge School, before going up to Trinity College, Oxford. While studying at Oxford, ...

                                               

Lord of the Isles (disambiguation)

Lordship of the Isles Greyhawk, the region of the World of Greyhawk fantasy game setting Lord of the Isles David Drake, the series of fantasy novels by David Drake

                                               

W. B. Foxs Villa

W. B. Foxs Villa is a historic farmhouse built in 1867 in Clifton Hill, Victoria, Australia. It was also known as The House of the Gentle Bunyip, an intentional Christian community established by Athol Gill. In the 1990s, the building had fallen ...

                                               

Baron Empain

Baron Empain is a title of nobility of the Kingdom of Belgium. The title was created in 1907 by Leopold II of Belgium for Edouard Empain, a wealthy Belgian engineer, entrepreneur, financier and industrialist, as well as an amateur Egyptologist. T ...

                                               

Tom Price

Tom Price judge born 1945, American judge, served in the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Tom Price actor born 1980, British actor Tom Price musician born 1956, American composer, arranger and conductor

                                               

Muirhead

Muirhead Collins 1852-1927, English-born Royal Navy officer, colonial Australian naval officer and public servant, and Australian federationist Muirhead surname Muirhead Bone 1876–1953, Scottish artist

                                               

James McLachlan

James McLachlan may refer to: James McLachlan Victorian politician 1862–1938, Australian politician James McLachlan Sr., member of the South Australian House of Assembly James McLachlan American politician 1852–1940, U.S. Representative from Cali ...

                                               

Paul Cullen

Paul Cullen may refer to: Paul Cullen rugby league born 1963, English rugby league coach and former player Paul Cullen, Lord Pentland born 1957, Scottish judge and former politician Paul Cullen, poisoned Treaty Oak Austin, Texas Paul Cullen cardi ...